Breastfeeding linked

Topic: Breastfeeding linked to lower blood pressure in early childhood

The findings of the study were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

According to a new research, babies who were breastfed, even for a few days, had lower blood pressure as toddlers and these differences in blood pressure may translate into improved heart and vascular health as adults.

The findings of the study were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

The research found that cardiovascular disease risk factors, including high blood pressure, can start in childhood.

Studies have also confirmed breastfeeding is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk in adulthood. However, the amount and length of time breastfeeding that is needed to achieve cardiovascular benefit has not been clear.

“This is the first study to evaluate the association of breastfeeding in the first days of life and blood pressure in early childhood,” said lead study author Kozeta Miliku, M.D., PhD, clinical science officer of the CHILD Cohort Study and post-doctoral fellow in medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

“Infants who received even a relatively small amount of their mother’s early breast milk, also known as colostrum, had lower blood pressure at 3 years of age, regardless of how long they were breastfed or when they received other complementary foods,” added Miliku.

Colostrum is known to be especially rich in growth factors, immunologic components and stem cells that are extremely beneficial to newborns and only found in human breastmilk.

Topic Discussed: Breastfeeding linked to lower blood pressure in early childhood

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